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20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
times" reporter michael gordon. he co-authored the book, "the generals' war: the inside story of the conflict in the gulf." michael, welcome. take us back first of all to the gulf war more than two decades ago. what was it about general schwarzkopf and what he did is that made him be regarded at least by many as a hero. >> well, this is the time in which the american military did not have the confidence of the american public the way it does now. whatever people think of the wars in afghanistan or iraq, they generally believe that the military has done its part. and that wasn't the case then. so we had an all-volunteer force. is there were a lot of weapons that had not really been tried in combat like the stealth fighter, not really in operational circumstances. and they were being put to the test. and there was also the hang over from vietnam, the vietnam syndrome when people wondered could we since vietnam was certainly not a victory, could the american military really succeed in a major conflict abroad? >> warner: so really how hard was strategy, how much did he contribute
name was peg mullen. she wrote a book about the death of her son, michael mullen. the name of the book was "friendly fire." norman schwartzkopf was the battalion commander. he was so approachable to peg mullen, so human in his relations with peg mullen, who sought to find out how her son was killed in vietnam. he died from friendly fire, which, you know obviously meant he was killed within the confines of his own unit by shrapnel from american weapons fired. it was so impressive to read about then a colonel later to become norm an schwartzkopf general "time" magazine's man of the year who was so human. just that clip we just showed right then compared to a lot of military officials who we see on tv. an actual human being would could say i hope i don't make a mistake. things like that. interesting, at least to me. >> i think very interesting. i grew up -- i was in high school in part of the anti-vietnam protest, so he was a symbol. you kind of respected him. as you grew holder, you learned that you can politically be different and still respect the man. he was the kind of guy that would
by "new york times" reporter michael gordon. he co-authored the book, "the generals' war: the inside story of the conflict in the gulf." michael, welcome. take us back first of all to the gulf war more than two decades ago. what was it about general schwarzkopf and what he did is that made him be regarded at least by many as a hero. >> well, this is the time in which the american military did not have the confidence of the american public the way it does now. whatever people think of the wars in afghanistan or iraq they generally believe that the military has done its part. and that wasn't the case then. so we had an all-volunteer force. is there were a lot of weapons that had not really been tried in combat like the stealth fighter not really in operational circumstances. and they were being put to the test. and there was also the hang over from vietnam, the vietnam syndrome when people wondered could we since vietnam was certainly not a victory, could the american military really succeed in a major conflict abroad? >> warner: so really how hard was strategy, how much did he contribute to
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)